Congratulations to the Participants and the Winners at the IEEE Brain Data Bank Competition in Glasgow

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Read more about the competition

Four Ethical Priorities for Neurotechnologies and AI

By Rafael Yuste, Sara Goering, et al
8 November 2017

Four Ethical Priorities for Neurotechnologies and AI

Consider the following scenario. A paralysed man participates in a clinical trial of a brain–computer interface (BCI). A computer connected to a chip in his brain is trained to interpret the neural activity resulting from his mental rehearsals of an action. The computer generates commands that move a robotic arm. One day, the man feels frustrated with the experimental team. Later, his robotic hand crushes a cup after taking it from one of the research assistants, and hurts the assistant. Apologizing for what he says must have been a malfunction of the device, he wonders whether his frustration with the team played a part.

This scenario is hypothetical. But it illustrates some of the challenges that society might be heading towards.

Read more – Nature

Inside the Race to Hack the Human Brain

By John H. Richardson
16 November 2017

Inside the Race to Hack the Human Brain

In an ordinary hospital room in Los Angeles, a young woman named Lauren Dickerson waits for her chance to make history.

She’s 25 years old, a teacher’s assistant in a middle school, with warm eyes and computer cables emerging like futuristic dreadlocks from the bandages wrapped around her head. Three days earlier, a neurosurgeon drilled 11 holes through her skull, slid 11 wires the size of spaghetti into her brain, and connected the wires to a bank of computers. Now she’s caged in by bed rails, with plastic tubes snaking up her arm and medical monitors tracking her vital signs.

Read More – Wired

Brain organoids get cancer, too, opening a new frontier in personalized medicine

By Sharon Begley
1 December 2017

Brain organoids get cancer, too, opening a new frontier in personalized medicine
Photo by Amanda Linkous

In 30 years as an oncologist, Dr. Howard Fine estimates he has treated some 20,000 patients with glioblastomas, the most deadly form of brain cancer, “and almost all of them are dead.” Of the 100 new glioblastoma patients he saw last month, “five years from now, only three will be alive,” he said.

Read More – STAT

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