Newsletter

Message from the Editor: A Year in Review

OPINION
R. Chavarriaga

As we enter a new year, it is a good time to look back at the activities of the IEEE Brain Initiative during the past 12 months. Our community has been extremely engaged on the advancement of neurotechnologies.

Brain Machine Interfaces, Artificial Intelligence and Neurorights

RESEARCH
M. Ienca

Progress in neurotechnology is critical to improve our understanding of the human brain and improve the delivery of neurorehabilitation and mental health services at the global level. We are now entering a new phase of neurotechnology development characterized by higher and more systematic public funding, diversified private sector investment, and increased availability of non-clinical neurodevices.

Could a Man Mistake a Hat for His Wife?

RESEARCH
C. Guger, G. Schalk, C. Kapeller

In 1985, Dr. Oliver Sacks published “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat,” which included the case of a man with visual agnosia who had trouble identifying faces. This case made many people think about what a remarkable challenge our brain routinely solves every day.

Are We There Yet? Brain-Machine Interfaces to Lower-limb Powered Exoskeletons

RESEARCH
J.L. Contreras-Vidal, Y. He, A. Kilicarslan, J.M. Azorín

Trauma to neural systems such as stroke and spinal cord injury (SCI) could irreversibly affect one’s ability to walk. Ambulation and rehabilitation after injuries has long been a research focus with great significance for patients to improve their quality of life. With recent advances in robotic technologies, lower-limb powered exoskeletons have emerged as an assistive and rehabilitative tool for disabled individuals to walk again.

Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering: Accelerating Neurotechnology Development

RESEARCH
T. Laabs

Tech billionaires are investing in neurotechnology with optimism. Elon Musk, Brian Johnson and Marc Zuckerberg, to name a few, cite enhancing human intelligence, boosting memory, and electronically sharing full sensory and emotional experiences as their goals. But is money enough to drive a revolution in neurotech or could the readiness level of the technology curtail their ambitions?

IEEE DataPort

OPINION

Would you like to get more exposure for your valuable Brain or Neuroscience research? Do you have datasets that require long-term storage and easy access long-term? You are invited to experience the exciting new data repository developed by IEEE called IEEE DataPort™! This IEEE data repository offers many benefits to researchers, data analysts, and institutions around the globe, and it is currently available at no cost.

Call for Participation: 2017 IEEE Brain Data Bank Challenges and Competitions

EVENTS

The IEEE Brain Initiative, in partnership with the IEEE Big Data Initiative and the IEEE Consumer Electronics Society, is excited to sponsor new competition opportunities throughout 2017, to explore Brain Data storage retrieval and analytics, the so called Brain Data Bank (BDB) Competitions. This “Call for Participation” is an extension of the popular brain-computer interface (BCI) Hackathons held in the prior year.

Welcome to BrainInsight

R. Chavarriaga

Welcome to the inaugural issue of BrainInsight, a quarterly online publication of the IEEE brain initiative. This is a space for the IEEE Brain community to share technical information and forward-looking commentary on brain-related research and technologies.

A Long Path Towards Restoring Locomotion After Spinal Cord Injury

RESEARCH
M. Capogrosso, T. Milekovic, G. Courtine

A century of research in spinal cord physiology has demonstrated that the circuits embedded in the lumbar spinal cord of mammals can autonomously produce repetitive patterns of motor activity resembling locomotion [1]. After a spinal cord injury (SCI), however, the neural pathways carrying information between the brain and these spinal circuits, usually located below the injury, are partly or completely interrupted. While the lumbar circuits are intact, this interruption disrupts or abolishes volitional leg movements.

Next Generation Neural Interfaces: Research on Emerging Technologies at Imperial College London

RESEARCH
D. Y. Barsakcioglu, S. Luan, L. Grand, T. G. Constandinou

The era of bioelectronic healthcare is dawning upon us. As electronic systems shrink in size and improve in functionality, we see more and more emerging devices that can track vital signs, such as heart rate and blood pressure, realising the grand vision of highly connected sensor nodes monitoring patients’ health beyond the hospital doors. The real revolution in digital healthcare, however, lies in bringing not only the diagnostics but also the therapy to the patient which requires interfacing the world of electronics with biology.

About BrainInsight

BrainInsight, the IEEE Brain Initiative eNewsletter, is a quarterly online publication, featuring practical and timely information and forward-looking commentary on neurotechnologies. BrainInsight describes recent breakthroughs in research, primers on methods of interests, or report recent events such as conferences or workshops.


Managing Editor

Ricardo Chavarriaga
Zurich University of Applied Science(ZHAW)
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